Queensland State Electoral Roll 1895, 1900, 1905, 1910, 1915

Electoral Rolls are the nearest thing Australians have to census records, at least at the end of the nineteenth and start of the twentieth century, and hence, they are both extremely important and useful for local, family and social historians. 

Printed electoral rolls were produced by Electoral Offices to assist in the management of elections. An electoral roll is a listing of all those residents eligible and registered to vote in a particular area. The register assists in the voting process and helps to prevent electoral fraud. Electoral rolls may also be used by the authorities for other purposes, such as to select people for jury duty.

In the nineteenth century, the management of elections, often under a restricted franchise, was undertaken by colonial authorities. From 1901, with federation, the Commonwealth Government gradually undertook the management of the rolls for both state and federal elections except for WA.

In the 19th century, any male aged 21 years or over, who occupied a house, warehouse or shop, who earned £25 per year or more, or who had held a miner’s licence for six months, was entitled to vote. However, people in some occupations, including the police, military and naval services were ineligible to vote. Persons who owned property in several different electoral divisions were entitled to vote in each. Women in Queensland were not given the right to vote until 1905, so they are not included in this electoral roll.

Because enrolment is compulsory for all eligible voters (with the exception of Norfolk Island) there is a strong chance that a person can be located.

1895

The electoral rolls for Queensland in 1895, which totals about 2500 pages in two volumes, are divided into the electoral districts of Queensland. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an estimated 98,240 men who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote.

1900

The roll for Queensland in 1900 totals about 3270 pages in two volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an estimated 131,160 men who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote. 

1905

The roll for Queensland in 1905 totals about 3450 pages in two volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an estimated 138,000 men who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote.  Women in Queensland were not given the right to vote until 1905.

1910

The roll for Queensland in 1910 totals almost 6000 pages in six volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an esimated 239,680 men and women who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote. 

1915

The roll for Queensland in 1915 totals about 14,830 pages in 12 volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of esimated 593,160 men and women who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote. 

The following information is included for many entries:

  • Christian Name and Surname
  • Qualification (residence, freehold, leasehold or householder)
  • Residence or Property
  • Age
  • Place of Abode
  • Occupation
  • Particulars of Qualification
  • Date When Claim Received by Electoral Register
  • Polling District