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QUEENSLAND ELECTORAL ROLL - 1860-1959

These are a treasure for any genealogy enthusiast, or if you're exploring your family history and building a family tree. There are a wide variety of State and Commonwealth electoral rolls in this collection. Please refer below for individual notes and instructions relevant to each set.


QUEENSLAND STATE ELECTORAL ROLLS 1860-1884

Please note that the 1860-1884 rolls are incomplete. Voting was not compulsory, and only males over the age of 21 years were eligible if they "satisfied certain ...... qualifications" or (until 1867 in Goldfield Electoral Districts) "held a miner's right or license for 6 months). However, "persons in Naval or Military service or in the Police Force, as well as Clerks of Petty Sessions and paid Police Magistrates were ineligible to vote". (quoted from Queensland State Archives brief guide to the use of State Electoral Rolls).

All care has been taken with transcription from microfilmed copies of original records, some of which were in poor condition. Please note also that the original rolls sometimes contained errors in the spelling of names and these have been transcribed as written. Fiche numbers have been included to enable researchers to check the original records on microfiche.

The following information is recorded for each entry:

• Surname
• Given Name
• Electoral District
• Year
• Qualification
• Residence
• Fiche No.

QUEENSLAND STATE ELECTORAL ROLLS 1895-1915

Printed electoral rolls were produced by Electoral Offices to assist in the management of elections. An electoral roll is a listing of all those residents eligible and registered to vote in a particular area. The register assists in the voting process and helps to prevent electoral fraud. Electoral rolls may also be used by the authorities for other purposes, such as to select people for jury duty.In the nineteenth century, the management of elections, often under a restricted franchise, was undertaken by colonial authorities. From 1901, with federation, the Commonwealth Government gradually undertook the management of the rolls for both state and federal elections except for WA.

In the 19th century, any male aged 21 years or over, who occupied a house, warehouse or shop, who earned £25 per year or more, or who had held a miner’s licence for six months, was entitled to vote. However, people in some occupations, including the police, military and naval services were ineligible to vote. Persons who owned property in several different electoral divisions were entitled to vote in each. Women in Queensland were not given the right to vote until 1905, so they are not included in this electoral roll.

Because enrolment is compulsory for all eligible voters (with the exception of Norfolk Island) there is a strong chance that a person can be located.

1895

The electoral rolls for Queensland in 1895, which totals about 2500 pages in two volumes, are divided into the electoral districts of Queensland. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an estimated 98,240 men who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote.

1900

The roll for Queensland in 1900 totals about 3270 pages in two volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an estimated 131,160 men who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote. 

1905

The roll for Queensland in 1905 totals about 3450 pages in two volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an estimated 138,000 men who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote.  Women in Queensland were not given the right to vote until 1905.

1910

The roll for Queensland in 1910 totals almost 6000 pages in six volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of an esimated 239,680 men and women who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote. 

1915

The roll for Queensland in 1915 totals about 14,830 pages in 12 volumes. Arranged alphabetically by district you will find details of esimated 593,160 men and women who resided in Queensland in this era, and who were qualified (and registered) to vote. 


The following information is included for many entries:
  • Christian Name and Surname
  • Qualification (residence, freehold, leasehold or householder)
  • Residence or Property
  • Age
  • Place of Abode
  • Occupation
  • Particulars of Qualification
  • Date When Claim Received by Electoral Register
  • Polling District

QUEENSLAND COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL ROLLS 1903, 1913, 1922, 1934, 1949, 1959

1903

This Commonwealth roll was the first since the federation of the Australian colonies in 1901 and provides information on 227,115 electors in Queensland who were registered to vote. Though women were not entitled to vote in Queensland State elections until 1905, women who were British subjects were able to register and vote from 1902 in the Commonwealth elections - many of whom are recorded in this database. This covers nine electoral divisions - Brisbane, Capricornia, Darling Downs, Herbert, Kennedy, Maranoa, Moreton, Oxley and Wide Bay.

1913

A redistribution of Queensland electorates occurred in 1913 and an additional Division created, known as Lilley. This database provides information on 361,925 electors in Queensland who were registered to vote on the Commonwealth Roll of 1913 (second print). Compulsory enrolment was introduced for all federal rolls from 1911 so the 1913 roll should reflect the adult population (over 21 years) excluding the foreign and indigenous population. Voting in Federal elections was not compulsory until 1925.

1922

A redistribution of Queensland electorates occurred in 1922 - no new divisions were created or abolished. This database provides information on 418,910 electors in Queensland who were registered to vote on the Commonwealth Roll of 1922. Compulsory enrolment was introduced for all federal rolls from 1911 so the 1922 should reflect the adult population (over 21 years) excluding the foreign and indigenous population. Voting in Federal elections was not compulsory until 1925.

1934

A redistribution of Queensland electorates occurred in 1934 - Griffith division was created, Oxley division abolished. This database provides information on 569,939 electors in Queensland who were registered to vote on the Commonwealth Roll of 1934. Compulsory enrolment was introduced for all federal rolls from 1911 so the 1934 should reflect the adult population (over 21 years) excluding the foreign and indigenous population. Voting in Federal elections was compulsory from 1925.

1949

A redistribution of Queensland electorates occurred in 1949 - Bowman, Dawson, Fisher, Leichhardt, MacPherson, Oxley, Petrie and Ryan Divisions were created, no Divisions were abolished. This database provides information on 756,118 electors in Queensland who were registered to vote on the Commonwealth Roll of 1949. Compulsory enrolment was introduced for all federal rolls from 1911 so the 1949 should reflect the adult population (over 21 years) excluding the foreign and indigenous population. Voting in Federal elections was compulsory from 1925.

1959

Queensland electoral divisions in 1959 were Bowman, Brisbane, Capricornia, Darling Downs, Dawson, Fisher, Griffith, Herbert, Kennedy, Leichhardt, Lilley, Maranoa, McPherson, Moreton, Oxley, Petrie, Ryan and Wide Bay. This database provides information on 783,079 electors in Queensland who were registered to vote on the Commonwealth Roll of 1959. Compulsory enrolment was introduced for all federal rolls from 1911 so the 1959 should reflect the adult population (over 21 years) excluding the foreign and indigenous population. Voting in Federal elections was compulsory from 1925.


The following information is recorded for each entry:
  • Number - the roll for each polling place has sequential numbers for all electors listed on the roll
  • Surname - Surname of each elector
  • Given name - Christian names of each elector at full length
  • Title - usually jun., sen. or similar
  • Place of living - This field may include a full street and town address, just a street address, just a town address, a property name, or other description
  • Occupation - recorded exactly as entered on the list
  • Sex - nominally M (male) or F (female) though in some cases the field has been left blank and in other cases recorded as E, B, H, R, T, FM, N, FG, D and S. Does not necessarily match the name and occupation.
  • Polling Place / Subdivision and Division - These fields identify the roll on which the electors were registered. 

QUEENSLAND COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL ROLL 1939

Here, you will find the details of about 600,000 voters who resided in Queensland at this time, and who were entitled (and registered) to vote. Importantly, the roll includes the names of many women qualified to vote. Please note that the 1939 roll is a PDF digitisation, so after searching, please check that your results are from "Newspapers, books & directories" (this will be on the top left hand of your search results screen).

The electoral divisions covered by this collection are:

  • Brisbane - Brisbane, Fortitude Valley, Ithaca, Kelvin Grove, Merthyr, Paddington, and Toowong
  • Capricornia - Banana, Bundaberg, Duaringa, Eidsvold, Emerald, Fitzroy, Gladstone, Keppel, Livingstone, Mount Morgan, Musgrave, Nebo, Rockhampton, Rockhampton North, St. Lawrence, and Springsure
  • Darling Downs - Allora, Clifton, Crow’s Nest, East Toowoomba, Esk, Gatton, Greenmount, Helidon, Highfields, Ipswich North, Killarney, Laidley, Leyburn, Marburg, Oakey, Rosewood, Toowoomba, Warwick, and Yarraman
  • Griffith - Bulimba, Buranda, Coorparoo, Kurilpa, Maree, South Brisbane and Stephens. There is a detailed map and description of the boundaries for each of the subdivisions.
  • Herbert - Ayr, Bowen, Ingham, Innisfail, Mackay, Mirani, Proserpine, Thuringowa, Townsville, and Tully
  • Kennedy - Alpha, Aramac, Atherton, Barcaldine, Boulia, Burke, Cairns, Charters Towers, Chillagoe, Clermont, Cloncurry, Cooktown, Croydon, Dalrymple, Douglas, Georgetown, Gordonvale, Herberton, Hughenden, Longreach, Mareeba, Muttaburra, Normanton, Pentland, Ravenswood, Richmond, Somerset, and Winton.
  • Lilley - Enoggera, Nundah, Sandgate, Toombul, and Windsor. There is a detailed map and description of the boundaries for each of the subdivisions.
  • Maranoa - Adavale, Augathella, Blackall, Bollon, Charleville, Chinchilla, Cunnamulla, Dalby, Eulo, Gayndah, Goondiwindi, Inglewood, Isisford, Jondaryan, Jundah, Miles, Mitchell, Nanango, Pittsworth, Roma, St. George, Stanthorpe, Surat, Tambo, Taroom, Texas, Thargomindah, Windorah, and Yeulba
  • Moreton - Beaudesert, Boonah, Bremer, Cleveland, Goodna, Harrisville, Ipswich, Logan, Moggill, Mount Gravatt, Sherwood, Southport, The Islands, and Wynnum
  • Wide Bay - Biggenden, Caboolture, Childers, Gin Gin, Gympie, Howard, Kilkivan, Landsborough, Maleny, Maryborough, Mount Perry, Nambour, North Pine, Pialba, Tiaro, Widgee, Wondai, and Woodford
  • The following information is included for most (but not all) entries:
  • No. on Roll
  • Christian name and surname in full
  • Place of living
  • Occupation
  • Sex
  • Commonwealth Division and the Subdivision

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